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  PUTUMAYO RELEASES 'INDIA' CD, BOOK


By NITISH S. RELE - editor@khaasbaat.com

Putumayo World Music, which was established to introduce people to the music of the world's cultures, recently released a new CD "India," ($14.98) in conjunction with its debut book "India: A Cultural Journey." ($29.95, 272 pages)

Showcasing India's rich musical variety, the CD features such classics as "Zara Zara" by Bombay Jayashri, "Tere Bina" by A.R. Rahman from "Guru," "Nagumomo" by Susheela Raman; "Ganesha" by Deepak Ram, "Vo Kuch," by Kiran Ahluwalia, "Maavan Te Tiyan" by Rajeshwari Sachdev, among others.

The pictorial book with 333 beautiful photos by Laurence Mouton and Sergio Ramazzotti and text by Catherine Bourzat offers such chapters as "Indian Pink & Saffron Yellow," "The Tumult of the Towns," "Bazaars & Markets, "The Taste of Tea," etc.

The CD and book are available at www.putumayo.com


UNDER THE COVER

Book Reviews
2 INDIAN AUTHORS NOMINATED FOR MAN BOOKER PRIZE
By NITISH S. RELE - editor@khaasbaat.com

Indian authors Aravind Adiga and Amitav Ghosh have been nominated for this year's Man Booker Prize for Fiction. The two are six of the novelists short listed for the nearly $92,000 prize, which will be announced Oct. 14. The other novelists are Sebastian Barry for "The Secret Scripture," Linda Grant for "the Clothes on their Backs," Philip Hensher for "The Northern Clemency" and Steve Toltz for "A Fraction of the Whole."

The Madras-born Adiga has been nominated for his book "The White Tiger," about a self-proclaimed social entrepreneur, a poor servant who has managed to rise above his station. He's also a murderer. He confesses the transfixing story of his life to the premier of China, who is expected to visit India on a mission to learn about entrepreneurialism.

Ghosh has been picked for "Sea of Poppies," the first volume of his Ibis Trilogy. During colonial upheaval, fate brings together a diverse cast of Indians and Westerners - from a bankrupt Raja to a widowed villager, from an evangelical English opium trader to a mulatto American freedman. As their old family ties are washed away they, like their historical counterparts, come to view themselves as jahaj-bhais or ship-brothers.






M. P. Ravindra Nathan
HEALTH & WELLNESS THE SEARCH FOR IMMORTALITY - PART I 'CHASING LIFE,' BY SANJAY GUPTA, M.D.
By M. P. RAVINDRA NATHAN, MD, FRCP (LONDON AND CANADA), FACP, FACC

Editor's Note: This series is designed to give you heads up on healthy living and graceful aging.

Medical illnesses have a way of cutting down one's life suddenly or shattering an entire career. While we dream of a long life with youthful vigor and vitality, many succumb to premature illnesses and death without being able to fulfill their ambitions and goals. And yet, modern day research tells us that the human body is built to last 120 years or may be even more. Often, when we look back at our own lives, we would say, "I wish I had been a little more careful; may be then I wouldn't have been in this predicament now."

But it is never too late to rectify your errors and modify your habits to get more mileage out of this life. While it may not be possible to achieve the proverbial 'immortality,' living to celebrate your own centenary - what you would call practical immortality - is quite exciting and certainly feasible. But you need to lay the foundation now.

For starters, read the book "Chasing Life" (Warner Wells, $24.99) by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, the famous CNN medical correspondent and neurosurgeon at Emory University. You can cash in on the 'longevity boom' that the scientists are talking about.

A groundbreaking book

"Chasing Life" is all about living longer and healthier. The task may appear daunting at first with all the self-imposed disciplines and restrictions to be observed consistently during one's lifetime, but once started on the right path, it is simple. In his quest for practical immortality and the elusive fountain of youth, the author takes us on a whirlwind tour to some of the centers in the world where important aging research is being done. He explores the claims of a prominent Russian physician, Dr. Alexander Tepliashin, who believes that he can reverse the aging process with stem cell therapy. The price tag? A cool $12,000 to $30,000 per treatment, but he has a lot of admirers and a faithful, elite clientele.

Read full story



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